" We were told that Byrne had been firing, and was in great spirits, boasting of what the gang was going to do. The work was hot, and he went to the counter for a drink. Finding that the weight of the armour prevented him throwing back his head to swallow the liquor he lifted the apron-shaped plate with one hand while with the other he lifted the glass to his mouth. In this attitude a chance bullet struck him in the groin, and spinning around once he fell dead "

II WOOLSHED TO STRINGYBARK II

As Mc Intyre scrambled through the bush on Kennedy's horse, he was hit on the head by a branch, and fell off. He crawled into a Wombat hole for the night, also he removed his boots in fear of tracks.

As he lay in the wombat hole, he wrote in his diary, and at dawn he began his slow walk back to Mansfield, and finally got there at around 6pm that night, one day after the gun-fight at Stringybark. He blurted out his story. The Kelly gang were now men on the run.

The gang spurred their horses back towards Greta, and returned home, after Margaret and possibly Kate Kelly, tended to Dan's shot shoulder, they headed off, towards the mighty Murray River.

With the help of Aaron Sherritt, the gang pushed to cross the Murray River, boarding the colonies New South Wales and Victoria, , which was already in full flood, they were without success, and spurred back towards Greta.

After eight days on the run, the gang were back at Ned and Dan's small cottage in Greta, with Mrs Kelly gone, it must have been a big change. And that visit back home, must have had some affect on Joe and the gang, and they decided to stick to the well-known ranges, where they could hide from the officers of justice.

Hence, on the 12th of November, the gang, were to surrender themselves, to the Mansfield Courthouse, after this date if the gang did not arrive at the Mansfield Courthouse, they would be declared outlaws.

The 12th of November came, and went, without sign of the Kelly gang in Mansfield. Three days later, on the 15th of November 1878, the gang were declared outlaws, and possibly the gang didn't even know that they were to be declared outlaws, perhaps it came in the delivery of Tom Lloyd as he bought the gang supplies in the ranges that afternoon.

During mid November Maggie Kelly had become quite an active Kelly sympathizer, she baked bread " In such quantities it could not have been for the ordinary family " Every night she would ride out to the gang's hiding place, on her horse " White-Foot "

Money, was a huge factor, that the gang were almost out of, after some decisions, the gang finally decided on the Euroa bank to be the site of the first Kelly gang robbery. On Sunday the 8th of December, Joe rode into Euroa and met up with long-time Kelly sympathizer, Ben Gould, Ben had got his cart bogged near the Eleven Mile creek, where the Kelly's lived. Ned explains the events of first meeting Ben and the problems he brought with him:

" In or about the spring of 1870 the ground was very soft a hawker named Mr Gould got his waggon bogged between Greta and my mother's house on the eleven mile creek, the ground was that rotten it would bog a duck in places so Mr. Gould had abandon his waggon for fear of loosing his horses in the spewy ground. he was stopping at my Mother's awaiting finer or dryer weather Mr. McCormack and his wife. hawkers also were camped in Greta the mosquitoes were very bad which they generally are in a wet spring and to help them Mr. Johns had a horse called Ruita Cruta although a gelding was as clever as old Wombat or any other Stallion at running horses away and taking them on his beat which was from Greta swamp to the seven mile creek consequently he enticed McCormack's horse away from Greta.

Mr. Gould was up early feeding his horses heard a bell and seen McCormack horses for he knew the horse well he sent his boy to take him back to Greta. When McCormack's got the horse they came straight out to Goold and accused him of working the horse; this was false, and Goold was amazed at the idea I could not help laughing to hear Mrs. McCormack accusing him of using the horse after him being so kind as to send his boy to take him from the Ruta Cruta and take him back to them.

I pleaded Goulds innocence and Mrs McCormack turned on me and accused me of bringing the horse from Greta to Goolds waggon to pull him out of the bog I did not say much to the woman as my Mother was present but that same day me and my uncle was cutting calves Gould wrapped up a note and a pair of the calves testicles and gave them to me to give them to Mrs McCormack. I did not see her and I gave the parcel to a boy to give to her when she would come instead of giving it to her he gave it to her husband consequently McCormack said he would summons me I told him neither me or Gould used their horse "

So, as Joe and Ben spoke of the events of the raid and Ben's part in it, they lunched at De Boos's hotel right near the bank that was to be robbed. Ben explained to Joe the events of the death of little Bill Gouge, was riding his horse, along Shean's creek road, before his hair was caught on a branch, snapping his neck, his funeral was to be held on Tuesday the 10th of December, a perfect time for the raid.

On Monday 9th of December, Joe and the gang rode into Faithfull's creek station, just north of Euroa, this well built home, would be the depot to hold their prisoners who were not attending the funeral of Bill Gouge, on their arrival, Ned alerted Mrs Fitzgerald, of the arrival, soon everyone on the station was bailed up. Soon Mr Gloster, a Hawker from Seymour arrived, as Ned attempted to bail him up, gloster withdrew a revolver, there was shouting until Gloster finally surrendered, he put on a good show, as he was a Kelly sympathizer.

Gloster had the measurements of " Ned and his colleagues " and " Fitted them quite handsomely " into the squatter style outfits. Joe selected a grey tweed paget coat, brown tweed trousers and vest, a Rob Roy shirt, black tie, elastic sided boots and a felt hat. As the gang walked over to the 20ft by 15ft shed, where the prisoners, would be kept, the gang answered questions, and smoked the night away.

The Morning of Tuesday 10th shined promising. As an assortment of prisoners were bailed up. After lunch, Joe, Ned and Steve cut down the telegraph lines. As the gang donned their new clothes from Gloster, the old, " Murder " clothes were piled into a heap and burnt.

At around 4: 30pm the gang without Joe, as Joe watched the prisoners, he strolled in and around the shed watching from each side. A train passed through town, a man jumped down from the train, examined the broken lines, Joe watched him nervously, and turning to place his shotgun down, as he looked out towards the man Joe realized he walking towards the home.

Joe quickly grabbed his shot gun and nervously bailed the man up. As Joe searched the 6 foot man for weapons, he unlocked the shed and added him to the prisoners. The man's name was Watt, a line repairer, and he recalled that Joe was " so nervous he could scarcely fix the key in the lock "

As Joe seen the carts trotting towards the home, he must have sighed in relief. Joe would now have learned that the raid was successful, and the gang had netted 2260 pounds into a sugar bag. At 7: 30 the gang ate dinner, and were prepared to leave at 8:00 pm, before a some trick riding was preformed by the gang, and they successfully rode out of Euroa, 2260 pounds richer.

At 8: 30pm the gang rode out " at full gallop.....in a perfect cloud of dust " and headed towards the ranges, the gang had staged arguably the most successfully raid in Australian history.

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

 

 

II WOOLSHED TO STRINGYBARK II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Sadlier writes of Joe's final scene in the Glenrowan Inn:

'We were told that Byrne had been firing, and was in great spirits, boasting of what the gang was going to do. The work was hot, and he went to the counter for a drink. Finding that the weight of the armour prevented him throwing back his head to swallow the liquor he lifted the apron-shaped plate with one hand while with the other he lifted the glass to his mouth.

In this attitude a chance bullet struck him in the groin, and spinning around once he fell dead'